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Conference papers

Counterfeit coinage of the Holy Roman Empire in the 16th century: silvering process and archaeometallurgical replications

Abstract : The Preuschdorf coin hoard, found in the Alsace, offered the opportunity to study silver-plated coins from the 16th to 17th century AD. 36 silvered coins have been studied and two silvering processes have been found: amalgam silvering for 44 % of the coins and a thin layer of pure silver for 56 % of the coins. The majority of the coins silvered with mercury were struck in Palatinate whereas those with pure silver come from the city of St. Gallen in Switzerland. In order to confirm these technologies, replications have been undertaken at the archaeological experimental platform in Melle (Deux Sèvres, France). The combination of the observation of non-restored coins and of the replication production gives a good representation of the silvering processes used in the Holy Roman Empire in the 16th century for producing counterfeit coins
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Conference papers
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https://hal-cea.archives-ouvertes.fr/cea-02368846
Contributor : Serge Palacin <>
Submitted on : Monday, November 18, 2019 - 4:37:51 PM
Last modification on : Thursday, June 25, 2020 - 2:54:03 PM

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  • HAL Id : cea-02368846, version 1

Citation

Lucile Beck, Elise Alloin, Anne Michelin, Florian Téreygeol, Claire Berthier, et al.. Counterfeit coinage of the Holy Roman Empire in the 16th century: silvering process and archaeometallurgical replications. Archaeometallurgy in Europe III, 2015, Bochum, Germany. ⟨cea-02368846⟩

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